Zev Rosenberg

/Zev Rosenberg

About Zev Rosenberg

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So far Zev Rosenberg has created 38 blog entries.

Hopes for the Chinese medical profession in 2012

2017-09-20T16:35:21+00:00 December 14th, 2011|

This year marks my 30th year in full-time practice as a Chinese medical practitioner (医生 yi sheng), and my sixtieth birthday will be in the spring. So it seems like an ideal time to contemplate medical practice and where we stand in our emerging field. I have some thoughts about where I'd like to see [...]

Practicing Chinese medicine in a Western society

2015-03-08T13:42:53+00:00 March 23rd, 2011|

It can be difficult to practice Chinese medicine in a Western society, because it cannot be simply grafted onto a different culture or medical system. Studying Chinese medicine means immersion in the world view and historical source texts that reveal the theoretical foundations of the subject. Chinese medicine has a unique view of the phenomenal [...]

A relationship between diet and longevity?

2017-09-20T16:35:21+00:00 July 27th, 2010|

In Confucian ethics, one's body is a gift from one's parents, and it is under our care and trust as long as we are alive. In addition, preserving our health is our obligation so that we may produce healthy children, who in turn will produce healthy offspring. In other words, health, like the environment, is [...]

Pulse Diagnosis in Early Chinese Medicine

2017-09-20T16:35:21+00:00 July 27th, 2010|

I am presently working my way through "Pulse Diagnosis in Early Chinese Medicine: The Telling Touch", (Cambridge University Press, 2110) a translation and commentary of Chunyu Yi's Memoir with twenty-five case histories. The translator is Elisabeth Hsu, one of our most prominent medical anthropologists, who researched and worked on this text over two decades What [...]

Alembic Herbals

2017-09-20T16:35:21+00:00 May 25th, 2010|

Welcome to my new blog, everyone. I am honored to share my thoughts on Chinese medicine and life with you all.  I intend the impossible, i.e. to communicate the subtleties of Chinese medicine as revealed in the classical texts such as the Nan Jing (Classic of Difficulties), Su Wen (Simple Questions), and Shang Han Lun (Treatise on Cold [...]